Elevation Physiotherapy | 2018 October
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October 2018

The season is fast approaching, and whether your interest is downhill or cross-country skiing, you should put in some preparation to ensure that your body is ready when the snow falls.  Injury prevention when skiing involves more than just physical strength:  one has to be mentally prepared and of course, ensure that the equipment is well-maintained. Physical components of ski fitness involve cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, strength training and balance skills.  If your legs get tired quickly, you increase the risk of falling after skiing only a few runs.  Evidence has shown that ski injuries are most likely to occur in the late morning or late afternoon after people have been on the hills/trails for a few hours.  The most common injuries are to the knees (20-32%) or thumbs (17-25%). Here are 3 tips: