Elevation Physiotherapy | Uncategorized
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A back problem can be a literal pain in the butt.  There is much that can be done to fix it, and your first stop should be an experienced physiotherapist who can assess your individual issue and help determine what positions and movements will be helpful to guide you back to a pain-free self!...

Maybe a better question would be who CAN’T benefit?  No, really… with life’s ever-moving flow and the list of “to-do’s” growing, how do you have time to catch your breath, or at least appreciate the little things?  It’s hard to live in the moment when there is limited time and a million things to do. Research shows that meditation techniques can calm your nervous system by connecting your brain with your breath and your body.  It isn’t the absence of thinking-- that isn’t possible.  But it is trying to train your brain to let go-- let go of doubting thoughts and self-critique and learn to accept just being. When your brain wanders, just come back to the breath. Many people don’t start meditating because they fear that they will be bad at it. The main focus of meditation is breathing.  If you can breathe, you can meditate.

Thanks for the mention in this article for https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/ It's important that every woman who has had a baby learn about a diastasis recti and gets checked to see if they have one.  There's much that can be done to help minimize a DR, but we need to keep this conversation going so women can learn about it and help to take care of themselves. https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/wellbeing/diasasis-recti-after-pregnancy...

We’ve all had injuries, either from some sports mishap or when you get tangled in the dog’s leash and fall over. What’s the first thing you do?  Reach for the ice.  We’ve always known (or thought, anyway) that icing that sprained ankle or swollen hand would be helpful to decrease pain and swelling after the injury.  After all, putting ice on restricts blood flow to the area, which helps to numb the pain and keep any swelling under control.  Were we wrong all along? Research on how effective ice is following injury is spotty at best.  A 2012 study in The British Journal of Sports Medicine determined that there were no studies that showed the effectiveness of icing after acute injuries.  In fact, a 2013 study from the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research showed that icing actually delayed recovery of muscle damage. Wait, what?

We’re not talking halitosis here!   Breathing is something that happens naturally all day and night, right?  Not necessarily. We often think of the “core” as just the abs and back muscles, but really it is the pelvic floor group at the bottom and the diaphragm at the top too.  As we take in breath, the diaphragm descends (to allow space for the lungs to expand), the rib cage expands, and both the abdominal wall and pelvic floor relax. When we exhale...