Elevation Physiotherapy | Pelvic Health
45
archive,category,category-pelvic-health,category-45,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,qode-page-loading-effect-enabled,,qode_grid_1300,qode-theme-ver-17.2,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.0.2,vc_responsive
 

Pelvic Health

Let’s face it—giving birth is trauma to the body, and it takes time to heal before returning to anything even remotely athletic.  Several authors established the guidelines below based on the classifications from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (Goom, Tom & Donnely, Grainne & Brockwell, Emma. (2019). Returning to running postnatal - Guidelines for...

Symptoms of urinary urgency or frequency are very common and can be incredibly disruptive to your life. It is not a good feeling to have to run your life by where your next bathroom is. A physiotherapist with advanced training to treat pelvic floor dysfunction can help! There are several factors that you need...

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is when the bladder or the uterus starts to descend in the vagina due to the muscles and connective tissue in the area not providing enough support. It is not typically painful per se, but can create a feeling of heaviness and pressure in the vagina that gets worse the...

Exercise is good, right?  But how soon is too soon after giving birth? If you had an uncomplicated vaginal birth, you can start gentle exercise (walking, stairs, breathing exercises, some abdominal exercises) almost immediately after giving birth, but clear it with a medical professional first.  Research on women who begin exercise after giving birth shows...

I always hesitate to use the word “normal”, as there are so many factors that go into how often you pee.  If you typically get up once in the night, then that is probably normal for you.  If your sleep is disrupted because you’re getting up more frequently, then possibly something needs to change during...

The pelvic floor group of muscles work like every other muscle in the body, but they are generally fairly ignored until someone has a problem. The muscles sling underneath from the pubic bone at the front of the pelvic to the tailbone at the back, and also wrap around the vagina, urethra and rectum. Since...

Do Men Need to Work Their Pelvic Floor Too?  Both men and women have biceps, quads, and most other muscles, so why would working this very important group of muscles be important only to women?  Think of the pelvic floor as a group of muscles that act as support and stability for the...

Prostate cancer is often diagnosed in men in their 50s and 60s, but younger men can experience this as well.  About 40% of men diagnosed with cancer are low-risk, and will have “active surveillance” over time, but it should start with a blood test to see the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) level.  If this...

It is really common for women to have some descent in their bladder, uterus or bowel, and it is not just women who have had babies—this condition can be an issue for women who have never had kids as well.  Research supports physiotherapy as a first-line treatment for pelvic organ...