Elevation Physiotherapy | New Research: Top 4 Insights on Pregnancy-Related Diastasis Recti
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New Research: Top 4 Insights on Pregnancy-Related Diastasis Recti

New Research: Top 4 Insights on Pregnancy-Related Diastasis Recti

 

A diastasis recti (DRA) is the gap in the abdominal muscles that occurs during and after pregnancy while your body accommodates for your growing baby.  Here’s some new information that is emerging

 

  1. The size of the “gap” in the rectus abdominal muscles is not clinically relevant: really?  This distance is what has traditionally been measured to determine the presence of the DRA, but now what is seen as more relevant is measuring the tension through the linea alba (connective tissue of the “gap”).  This is determined through a contraction of the pelvic floor muscles
  2. The function of the linea alba is interdependent with the function of the pelvic floor—the “inner unit” needs to have good control before outer unit and functional exercises. Translation:  work on pelvic floor muscles and breath/ pressure control first, then one can add other “core” work—lower abs, glutes, inner thighs, functional exercises like squats and lunges
  3. Optimal management of intra-abdominal pressure is key: the “canister” of the core is created through the deep back muscles, the pelvic floor group, the diaphragm, the abdominal muscles and the linea alba between the abs—all muscles need to work together and consider the abdominal pressure produced.
  4. It is safe to move, and women should ensure they stay moving throughout the process of helping their DRA