Elevation Physiotherapy | Blog
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It is surprising to many people to learn that your back muscles are likely not the cause or driver behind back pain.  Your brain recognizes that pain is not normal and can go into "protective" mode and the muscles can spasm or not work normally as a result, but they are not often the cause of the issue.  Check out this video below to explain more: [video width="400" height="224" mp4="http://elevation-physio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Video-4-Back-muscles-are-not-weak.mp4"][/video]...

We all know that there isn't likely one movement or exercise that is appropriate for everyone, but the "sloppy" push up can be helpful for many people.  People tend to sit slouched and spend WAY too much time with their spine rounded forward, so this is a nice movement to get out of that, and nothing you happen to do in your day puts your back near there unless you make a point of it! Remember, the "sloppy" push up should...

Thanks for the mention in this article for https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/ It's important that every woman who has had a baby learn about a diastasis recti and gets checked to see if they have one.  There's much that can be done to help minimize a DR, but we need to keep this conversation going so women can learn about it and help to take care of themselves. https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/wellbeing/diasasis-recti-after-pregnancy...

This is Part 2 out of 5 short videos on Your Journey to a Better Back, and we're speaking about the importance of movement-- it doesn't have to be a new sport or formalized program at the gym.  Here we list various strategies that one can easily incorporate at work. [video width="400" height="230" mp4="http://elevation-physio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Video-2.mp4"][/video]...

Sitting posture is key! We all know it’s not a great thing for the body to sit for many hours every day, so at least have most of that time with minimal stressors on your body.  Sit with a supplemental lumbar support so that your spine can easily maintain the natural inward curve in the lower back that is present when you stand.  When you correct from the bottom, it helps to align everything higher up.  More than that,...

An interesting article where I both wholeheartedly agree and don't agree: the researchers report that "the best form of exercise is the one that you are going to stick with". Exercise in the form of general movement is generally fantastic, but often there are specific directions/ movements that could actually help repair the problem-- read more  If this interests you, you will find the blog from July to be a great read. View original article:  www.scientificamerican.com  ...

Life is so different after a baby!  Not just with having a new addition to your family, but now it’s not only about you anymore.  But it’s still somewhat about you… that’s what so many Moms forget.  You have to be good to yourself, and you have to get back to your best, fullest you! When you’re looking to start back to exercise, whether it’s something you’re looking to return to after giving birth or it’s some new activity, you have to remember that your body is different now.

We’ve all had injuries, either from some sports mishap or when you get tangled in the dog’s leash and fall over. What’s the first thing you do?  Reach for the ice.  We’ve always known (or thought, anyway) that icing that sprained ankle or swollen hand would be helpful to decrease pain and swelling after the injury.  After all, putting ice on restricts blood flow to the area, which helps to numb the pain and keep any swelling under control.  Were we wrong all along? Research on how effective ice is following injury is spotty at best.  A 2012 study in The British Journal of Sports Medicine determined that there were no studies that showed the effectiveness of icing after acute injuries.  In fact, a 2013 study from the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research showed that icing actually delayed recovery of muscle damage. Wait, what?