Elevation Physiotherapy | Blog
37
blog,paged,paged-2,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,qode-page-loading-effect-enabled,,qode_grid_1300,qode-theme-ver-17.2,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.6,vc_responsive
 

Blog

The season is fast approaching, and whether your interest is downhill or cross-country skiing, you should put in some preparation to ensure that your body is ready when the snow falls.  Injury prevention when skiing involves more than just physical strength:  one has to be mentally prepared and of course, ensure that the equipment is well-maintained. Physical components of ski fitness involve cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, strength training and balance skills.  If your legs get tired quickly, you increase the risk of falling after skiing only a few runs.  Evidence has shown that ski injuries are most likely to occur in the late morning or late afternoon after people have been on the hills/trails for a few hours.  The most common injuries are to the knees (20-32%) or thumbs (17-25%). Here are 3 tips:

The pelvic floor group of muscles act like any other muscle in your body, and they take consistent work to make them stronger and get them flexible.  It is important that they get regular use, and you have to train your brain to know how to contract the pelvic floor muscles properly and build endurance and control. A proper pelvic floor contraction, or a Kegel, is a lift:  imagine a marble sitting outside your vagina and you want to just bring it inside.  

No one has ever told me that they feel they have injured their (fill in the blank here) because they are too strong.  I agree with this article in The Globe and Mail on two tenets of strength training. I would also emphasize that form is important, and breathing is even...

Breathing is under-rated.  People who lift weights understand that it is important to breath when actually lifting the weight, since holding your breath can increase blood pressure or potentially cause a hernia.  It is important to breath with exertion to control the increase in abdominal pressure that happens. Women who work with a pelvic health physiotherapist after they have given birth learn to master core breathing, which is the same exhalation with exertion, but adding a pelvic floor muscle contraction with every exhale. “Core Breathing” is using your breath when you properly contract your pelvic floor muscles with movement.  You want to inhale, expand your belly and relax your pelvic floor, then when you exhale, lift and engage your pelvic floor muscles. Try these two exercises:

A back problem can be a literal pain in the butt.  There is much that can be done to fix it, and your first stop should be an experienced physiotherapist who can assess your individual issue and help determine what positions and movements will be helpful to guide you back...